We can support you in a number of ways:

Seafarers Hospital Society is an established charity dedicated to meeting health, welfare and advice needs of seafarers. We provide health and welfare grants and a number of other services exclusively for seafarers. If you are, or have been a merchant seafarer or a fisher we’re here to help you and the people who depend on you. We also provide advice and support to Royal Navy and Royal Marine personnel through SAIL.

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Fast access to physiotherapy

Working at sea is one of the most challenging jobs in the UK and the number of work-related injuries is high.

Time spent offshore means it can be difficult getting treatment so the Seafarers Hospital Society is backing free, fast-track physiotherapy treatment for working seafarers.

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Mental health and wellbeing

Working at sea can be challenging to your mental health too. We offer a free, confidential service to seafarers who need help with mental health and wellbeing issues run by Togetherall. It includes access to trained counsellors, a support network, self-help materials and one-to-one therapy. The service is entirely confidential and delivered online.

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Grants to seafarers

Life can be unpredictable, no matter how carefully you plan. Sudden illness, unexpected changes in circumstances, the loss of someone you love can cause financial and emotional distress. That’s where we come in. We can help you with unpaid bills and grants for essential household goods, disability aids and equipment, and other unexpected expenses.

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Respite care

Respite care supports caregivers by giving them the opportunity for a temporary break from their caregiving duties. We can fund short-term breaks for caregivers which will not only alleviate stress, but also restore energy and balance to their lives.

If you or someone in your family needs respite care, the Seafarers Hospital Society may be able to help.

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SeaFit programme

SeaFit is a long-term programme targeting the fishing community. Designed to improve the physical, mental health and wellbeing of fishers throughout the UK, delivered in partnership with the Fisherman’s Mission. It links with NHS and Public Health services to facilitate access to local health promotion and prevention initiatives and, where services are limited, works with the local teams to support outreach into the fishing communities.

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Advice service SAIL

The Seafarers’ Advice and Information Line (SAIL) is a national telephone advice service exclusively for seafarers. SAIL provide free, confidential and impartial advice and information to seafarers on a wide range of issues – welfare benefits, housing, employment and more.

Click here to access SAIL

Dreadnought Medical Service

Based at St Thomas’ Hospital in London and supported by SHS, the Dreadnought offers priority NHS treatment for working seafarers. Due to the nature of their work, seafarers are unable to make routine appointments and are not permitted to work if they have certain medical conditions, in case of an emergency whilst at sea.

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Not sure where to start?

Get in touch with us and we can assess your requirements and get you the help you need.

020 8858 3696
[email protected]

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2020: Our work in numbers

334

People given dental treatment & advice via our SeaFit programme

420

Number of physio sessions provided

1500

People engaged with SeaFit Healthy Lifestyle Advisors

£409,805

Total value of grants given out in 2020

Find out more about how we can help you

Case studies

Frances Puddifer of Liverpool was a stewardess on Irish Car Ferries. Now retired, Frances was finding it increasingly difficult to cope with the stairs in her home. With a grant from three maritime charities, including one of £425 from the Society, she’s been able to install a stairlift.

Frances Puddifer says “It was the best Christmas present ever!”

Bob Mackie of Grimsby worked for 45 years a fisherman in spite of a number of accidents and the early loss of one leg. When he retired the Society gave him a grant of £1,500 towards the cost of a scooter.

Bob Mackie says “My new scooter is fantastic. I couldn’t have afforded it without the grant. Thanks to the Society I now have my independence back.”

Paul Hagan of Leicester served for 10 years with the merchant navy. After leaving, he lost his leg in an accident. A fitness fan, he became a wheelchair athlete but had to give this up too because of nerve damage.

His service at sea meant that he was able to get a £400 grant from the Seafarers Hospital Society, which he put with grants from other sources to buy a hand cycle.

Brian Broome was at sea all his working life from the age of 14, first as a merchant seaman, then as a fisherman. In 1960 he changed to mooring vessels, where he spent over 40 years mooring tankers and other large ships. He was at sea for a total of 51 years.

When he retired in 2012 he was in good health and active, but in 2016 he developed type 2 diabetes.

Stephen Astley is a line fisherman from Newlyn, locally nicknamed "Cod", who was admitted to hospital with progressive sepsis and organ failure. Luckily for Cod, his life was saved but he needed extensive surgery – both legs were amputated at the knee and he lost several fingers.

Thanks to the Society and our partners, Cod could return to fishing safely.

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